Posted tagged ‘e-learning’

My decade of provocation

27 April 2018

On this day 10 years ago, I pressed the “Publish” button on my first ever blog post.

It was a welcome message pitching my corner of the World Wide Web as “a forum to share my thoughts and ideas about everything e‑learning, to explore new tools and technologies, and to highlight trends and changing behaviours in the online world.”

A cupcake with 10 candles.

I initially titled my blog Ryan 2.0 – hence the URL – because “on a personal level, it represents my next big step in our evolving participatory culture. Just as the shift from Web 1.0 to Web 2.0 represents a change from one-way transmission to two-way participation on the Internet, the shift from Ryan 1.0 to Ryan 2.0 represents a similar change in myself.”

Early posts such as Text ain’t half bad and Don’t convert… transform! were about getting ideas off my chest and seeing how they fared among my peers. Later posts such as Collateral damage and The 70:20:10 lens have been more about reflection and sense making, accompanied by the joining of dots to generate fresh insights.

I soon re-titled my blog E-Learning Provocateur, not only for unique branding, but also to better convey my intent to provoke deeper thinking in the digital learning space and across L&D more broadly.

Some of my posts have been contrarian, others counter-contrarian. Some such as Taxonomy of Learning Theories and Online courses must die! have proved surprisingly popular, while my annual list of E-Learning conferences in Australia has become somewhat of a tradition.

But it hasn’t all been beer and skittles. As a result of my blogging, I’ve been insulted, trolled, condescended to, and talked at. On the flip side, however, I’ve also been validated, supported, engaged with, and commended. I’m pleased to report the latter interactions have far exceeded the former. By a country mile.

Over the years I’ve encountered peers with a growth mindset, and peers with a fixed mindset. Some of their comments have been constructive, others less so. I’ve agreed with many, disagreed with many others. Plenty of folks have convinced me to change my mind, or at least tweak my original thought. And so I’ve grown intellectually.

Through my various interactions I’ve acquired an allergy to absolutism. I now have the wisdom to recognise declarations such as “X is dead” or “Y doesn’t work” to be nonsensical. What is “right” for you may not be right for me, and vice versa. It’s all circumstantial.

I’ve also significantly raised my profile – both locally & internationally. When a stranger approaches me at a conference to praise my blog, it still blows. my. mind.

Yet at the end of the day, I don’t think I’m that clever. I just strive to be open and honest, sharing my ideas and experiences while respecting those of others.

I also like to think I add a dose of courage. Otherwise I never would have pressed that “Publish” button in the first place.

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E-Learning conferences in Australia in 2018

2 January 2018

Well 2018 is shaping up to be a strong year of professional development opportunities for e-learning professionals down under.

A good spread of conferences is already scheduled along the Eastern Seaboard, while more will inevitably pop up (perhaps further west?) as the year progresses.

The following list is organic, so keep an eye on it!

Baywalk Bollards representing lifesavers in Geelong, Australia.

International Conference on E-Learning and Distance Learning
Sydney, 29-30 January 2018

International Conference on Distance Education and Virtual Learning
Melbourne, 1-2 February 2018

The Art of Knowledge Management, Learning & Communication
Melbourne, 22 February 2018

International Conference on Virtual and Augmented Reality Simulations
Brisbane, 24-26 February 2018

Chief Digital Officer Summit
Sydney, 26 February – 3 March 2018

iDESIGNX
Sydney, 27 February 2018

Learning Analytics and Knowledge Conference
Sydney, 5-9 March 2018

National FutureSchools Expo and Conferences
Melbourne, 21-22 March 2018

Digital Disruption
Sydney, 26-27 March 2018

L&D Leadership Innovation Summit
Sydney, 26-29 March 2018

Strategy & Innovation World Forum
Sydney, 9-10 May 2018

Online & e-Learning Summit
Melbourne, 15-16 May 2018

CeBIT Australia
Sydney, 15-17 May 2018

Totara User Conference – Asia Pacific
Sydney, 5-6 June 2018

AITD National Conference
Sydney, 7-8 June 2018

The Future of Learning Conference
Brisbane, 21-22 June 2018

Learning While Working
Virtual, 17-18 July 2018

Leading a Digital School Conference
Sunshine Coast, 16-18 August 2018

Blackboard Teaching & Learning Conference ANZ
Brisbane, 28-31 August 2018

K-12 Digital Classroom Practice Conference
Melbourne, 31 August 2018

FlipCon Australia
Melbourne, 14-15 September 2018

MoodleMoot Australia
Brisbane, 24–26 September 2018

Enterprise Learning Confluence
Sydney, 26 September 2018

Eportfolio Forum
Brisbane, 3-4 October 2018

Australian Council for Computers in Education Conference
Sydney, 2-5 October 2018

L&D Innovation & Tech Fest
Sydney, 29-30 October 2018

LearnX
Melbourne, 30 October 2018

ASCILITE
Geelong, 25-28 November 2018

Lanyard

If you are aware of another e-learning related conference down under this year, please let me know and I’ll add it to the list.

Deep diving into strange worlds

11 December 2017

2017 was a whirlwind for me. I started a new job in a new sector, made loads of new friends there, learned heaps, and finished said job 10 months later before starting another one back in financial services.

I haven’t had much of a chance to scratch myself!

As a consequence, I haven’t blogged as frequently this year as I have done in previous years. However, while my posts may have been fewer, I dove deeper into a couple of topics of interest.

Pulp magazine cover entitled Enormous Stories

Data science was one such topic that captured my attention, not only because it’s white hot, but also because I believe it will inform our practice like never before.

I also focused my mind on capability frameworks. Not the most exciting topic, I know, but in my opinion a driver of business performance.

Somehow I also stole enough time to share my thoughts on virtual reality, journals, games, conferences, and the employee lifecycle.

Data science

Capability frameworks

Miscellany

I invite you to review my posts and leave a comment on any that elicit a response. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

In the meantime, here’s to a great 2018!

5 games every e-learning professional should play

3 April 2017

You can narrow down someone’s age by whether they include spaces in their file names. If they do, they’re under 40.

That is a sweeping declaration, and quite possibly true.

Here’s another one… Gamers are a sub-culture dominated by young men.

This declaration, however, is stone-cold wrong. In fact, 63% of American households are home to someone who plays video games regularly (hardly a sub-culture). Gamers are split 59% male / 41% female (approaching half / half) while 44% of them are over the age of 35 (not the pimply teenagers one might expect). [REF]

In other words, the playing of video games has normalised. As time marches on, not gaming is becoming abnormal.

Woman and man seated on a couch playing a video game.

So what does this trend mean for e-learning professionals? I don’t quite suggest that we start going to bed at 3 a.m.

What I do suggest is that we open our eyes to the immense power of games. As a profession, we need to investigate what is attracting and engaging so many of our colleagues, and consider how we can harness these forces for learning and development purposes.

And the best way to begin this journey of discovery is by playing games. Here are 5 that I contend have something worthwhile to teach us…

1. Lifesaver

Lifesaver immediately impressed me when I first played it.

The interactive film depicts real people in the real world, which maximises the authenticity of the learning environment, while the decision points at each stage gate prompt metacognition – which is geek speak for realising that you’re not quite as clever as you thought you were.

The branched scenario format empowers you to choose your own adventure. You experience the warm glow of wise decisions and the consequences of poor ones, and – importantly – you are prompted to revise your poor decisions so that the learning journey continues.

Some of the multiple-choice questions are unavoidably obvious; for example, do you “Check for danger and then help” or do you “Run to them now!”… Duh. However, the countdown timer at each decision point ramps up the urgency of your response, simulating the pressure cooker situation in which most people I suspect would not check for danger before rushing over to help.

Supplemented by extra content and links to further information, Lifesaver is my go-to example when recommending a game-based learning approach to instructional design.

2. PeaceMaker

Despite this game winning several prestigious awards, I hadn’t heard of PeaceMaker until Stacey Edmonds sang its praises.

This game simulates the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in which you choose to be the Israeli Prime Minister or the Palestinian President, charged with making peace in the troubled region.

While similar to Lifesaver with its branched scenario format, its non-linear pathway reflects the complexity of the situation. Surprisingly quickly, your hipsteresque smugness evaporates as you realise that whatever you decide to do, your decisions will enrage someone.

I found this game impossible to “win”. Insert aha moment here.

3. Diner Dash

This little gem is a sentimental favourite of mine.

The premise of Diner Dash is beguilingly simple. You play the role of a waitress in a busy restaurant, and your job is to serve the customers as they arrive. Of course, simplicity devolves into chaos as the customers pile in and you find yourself desperately trying to serve them all.

Like the two games already mentioned, this one is meant to be a single player experience. However, as I explain in Game-based learning on a shoestring, I recommend it be deployed as a team-building activity.

4. Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes

As its name suggests, Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes is a multi-player hoot. I thank Helen Blunden and David Kelly for drawing it to my attention.

In the virtual reality version of the game, the player wearing the headset is immersed in a room with a bomb. The other player(s) must relay the instructions in their bomb defusal manual to their friend so that he/she can defuse said bomb. The trouble is, the manual appears to have been written by a Bond villain.

It’s the type of thing at which engineers would annoyingly excel, while the rest of us infuriatingly fail. And yet it’s both fun and addictive.

As a corporate e-learning geek, I’m also impressed by the game’s rendition of the room. It underscores for me the potential of using virtual reality to simulate the office environment – which is typically dismissed as an unsuitable subject for this medium.

5. Battlefield 1

I could have listed any of the latest games released for Xbox or PlayStation, but as a history buff I’m drawn to Battlefield 1.

It’s brilliant. The graphics, the sounds, the historical context, the immersive realism, are nothing short of astonishing. We’ve come a long way since Activision’s Tennis.

Activision's Tennis video game on a vintage TV featuring two blocky players on court.

My point here is that the advancement of gaming technology is relentless. While we’ll never have the budget of Microsoft or Sony to build anything as sophisticated as Battlefield 1, it’s important we keep in touch with what’s going on in this space.

Not only can we be inspired by the big end of town and even pick up a few design tips, we need to familiarise ourselves with the world in which our target audience is living.

What other games do you recommend we play… and why?

10 journals every e-learning professional should read

7 February 2017

I was delighted when Matt Guyan blogged 5 Books Every eLearning Professional Should Read in response to my 5 papers every learning professional should read.

I feel the urge to lob the ball back over the net, so I shall do so now with a list of 10 journals I believe every e-learning professional should read.

By “journals”, I mean academic periodicals that publish the results of empirical research.

By “read”, I mean scan the abstracts occasionally as time permits, while deep-diving into a particular paper if it arouses sufficient interest.

A tennis ball resting on a tennis racquet.

Here are the journals in alphabetical order. Each one is freely accessible.

  1. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology
  2. Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology
  3. Current Issues in Emerging eLearning
  4. Electronic Journal of e-Learning
  5. International Journal of Advanced Corporate Learning
  6. Journal of Educational Technology & Society
  7. Journal of Interactive Media in Education
  8. Journal of Online Learning Research
  9. Online Learning
  10. Research in Learning Technology

Do you have any others to add to the list?

E-Learning conferences in Australia in 2017

10 January 2017

Sydney is evidently the place to be for e-learning pro’s who are keen to develop their knowledge and skills this year. Even EduTECH, the darling of Brisbane’s educational technology scene, is travelling south for the winter.

Having said that, there are opportunities elsewhere, and more will emerge as time marches on. The following list of conferences is an organic one, so keep an eye on it as the year progresses.

If you are after workshops, webinars, or other PD offerings that don’t quite fit the definition of “conference”, may I refer you to the Australian Institute of Training and Development. You might also be interested in The eLearning eXperts’ eLearning Events Calendar.

A ferry on Sydney Harbour with the Sydney Harbour Bridge and the city in the background.

International Conference on E-Learning and Distance Learning
Sydney, 26-27 January 2017

International Conference on Education and E-Learning
Brisbane, 4-5 February 2017

International Conference on Virtual and Augmented Reality Simulations
Sydney, 18-21 February 2017

Learning Cafe UnConference
Sydney, 23 February 2017

iDESIGNX
Brisbane, 23 February 2017

Gamechangers Summit
Sydney, 28 February – 2 March 2017

Higher Education: Gen Next
Canberra, 1-3 March 2017

The Wheels of Knowledge Management
Melbourne & Canberra, 7 & 9 March 2017

National Blended Learning Conference
Sydney, 14-15 March 2017

Creative Tools for Engagement in the Public Sector
(Gamification)

Canberra, 21-23 March 2017

National FutureSchools Conferences
Melbourne, 23-24 March 2017

Connect Expo
Melbourne, 29-30 March 2017

Disruptive Innovation Week
Sydney, 30-31 March 2017

International Conference on Serious Games
and Applications for Health

Perth, 2-4 April 2017

AITD National Conference
Sydney, 11-12 May 2017

LX Conference
Online, 15-19 May 2017

CeBIT Australia
Sydney, 23-25 May 2017

Chief Learning Officer 2017
Sydney, 23-25 May 2017

EduTECH
Sydney, 8-9 June 2017

Online & E-Learning Summit
Sydney, 20-21 June 2017

Learning Analytics 2017
Sydney, 20-22 June 2017

Learning Innovation Summit 2017
Melbourne, 21 July 2017

Forward Government Learning 2017
Melbourne, 26-27 July 2017

Knowledge Management Australia 2017
Sydney, 1-3 August 2017

eLearnz eLab 2017
Sydney, 8-9 August 2017

Learning Cafe UnConference
Melbourne, 17 August 2017

Australasian Simulation Congress
Sydney, 28-31 August 2017

K-12 Digital Classroom Practice Conference
Melbourne, 2-3 September 2017

LearnX
Sydney, 6 September 2017

Blackboard Teaching & Learning Conference ANZ
Darwin, 6-8 September 2017

Educhange
Melbourne, 25-29 September 2017

MoodleMoot Australia 2017
Sydney, 26-28 September 2017

The Future of Learning Conference
Sanctuary Cove, 28-29 September 2017

EdTechPosium
Canberra, 30-31 October 2017

Social Learning Conference
Sydney, 27-28 November 2017

ASCILITE 2017
Toowoomba, 4-6 December 2017

Lanyard

If you are aware of another e-learning related conference down under in 2017, please let me know and I’ll add it to the list.

Cognitive Reality

7 December 2016

Yet another year has come and gone at the speed of light!

For me, 2016 has been the year in which the Virtual Reality rubber finally met the road, while Augmented Reality made a surprise splash into the mainstream via those pesky Pikachu.

As a consequence, VR & AR dominated much of my blogging attention this year. But they weren’t the be-all-and-end-all of the e-learning universe. Plenty of other topics occupied my mind, from 70:20:10 and 3D printing to the extended enterprise and our universally despised compliance training regime.

I hope you found something useful among my musings, and I invite you to catch up on any that you may have missed…

Pulp fiction cover entitled Amazing Wonder Stories: Cognitive Reality: Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, and other stuff!

Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality

Other stuff

Vintage spaceship

To those who celebrate Christmas, I wish you a merry one, and I look forward to reconnecting with everyone in 2017.