Tag: online

Digital Learning conferences in Australia in 2021

Let’s try that again.

Just as we were gearing up for another year’s worth of cutting edge insights and showcases, the coronavirus had other ideas.

While some of the digital learning conferences I had listed for 2020 went ahead as planned, others pivoted to virtual delivery, while the rest were ironically postponed or cancelled.

In this country we are confident in vaccination and elimination, so the following events are expected to proceed this year.

Coffee mug next to a laptop featuring numerous attendees in an online meeting

EDIT: The ongoing pandemic may affect these events. Please refer to each event’s website for more information.

iDESIGNX
Virtual, 24-25 February 2021

Disruptive Innovation Summit
Sydney, 17-19 March 2021

International Conference on Virtual and Augmented Reality Simulations
Melbourne, 20-22 March 2021

Learning & Development Leadership Summit
Sydney, 23-24 March 2021

Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia Conference
Brisbane, 7-10 July 2021

Learning & Development Leadership Summit
Melbourne, 27-28 July 2021

EduTECH / Learn@Work
Virtual, 17-18 August 2021

Eportfolio Forum
Virtual & Sydney, 20-21 October 2021

AITD Conference
Virtual & Melbourne, 27-28 October 2021

LearnX Live! Awards
Virtual, 17 November 2021

HR Innovation & Tech Fest
Sydney, 9-10 November 2021

TECHSPO
Sydney, 24-25 November 2021

Future Work APAC Summit
Adelaide, 24-25 November 2021

L&D Symposium
Hunter Valley, 25-26 November 2021

ASCILITE
Armidale, 29 November – 1 December 2021

This list will grow over time as more events are announced.

If you become aware of another one, let me know and I’ll add it in!

E-Learning conferences in Australia in 2020

The iconic “2020” has dawned.

What does it mean for digital learning?

Let’s find out…

Sydney Opera House at night

EDIT: The COVID-19 pandemic may affect these events. Please refer to the event’s website for more information.

International Conference on E-Learning and Distance Learning
Sydney, 30-31 January 2020

International Conference on Virtual and AR Simulations
Sydney, 14-16 February 2020

Blended Learning & Innovation Summit
Sydney, 24-27 February 2020

iDESIGNX
Sydney, 26 February 2020

AITD Conference
Online, 17-18 March 2020

International Conference on Mobile Learning Technology and Online Education
Online, 26-27 March 2020

International Conference on Education and E-Learning
Online, 8-9 May 2020

Melbourne Learning Summit
Online, 18 June 2020

The Learning Conference
Online, 3-5 August 2020

Future Work Summit
Online, 3 September 2020

LearnX Live
Online, 16-17 September 2020

EdTEchSA State Conference
Online, 29 September 2020

Online & e-Learning Summit
Online, 27-29 October 2020

Learn@Work
Online, 9-10 November 2020

Learning & Development Leadership Summit
Sydney, 9-10 November 2020

L&D Innovation & Tech Fest
Online, 7-11 December 2020

If you’re aware of another Australian conference relevant to e-learning professionals, please let me know and I’ll add it to the list!

10 journals every e-learning professional should read

I was delighted when Matt Guyan blogged 5 Books Every eLearning Professional Should Read in response to my 5 papers every learning professional should read.

I feel the urge to lob the ball back over the net, so I shall do so now with a list of 10 journals I believe every e-learning professional should read.

By “journals”, I mean academic periodicals that publish the results of empirical research.

By “read”, I mean scan the abstracts occasionally as time permits, while deep-diving into a particular paper if it arouses sufficient interest.

A tennis ball resting on a tennis racquet.

Here are the journals in alphabetical order. Each one is freely accessible.

  1. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology
  2. Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology
  3. Current Issues in Emerging eLearning
  4. Electronic Journal of e-Learning
  5. International Journal of Advanced Corporate Learning
  6. Journal of Social Media for Learning
  7. Journal of Interactive Media in Education
  8. Journal of Online Learning Research
  9. Online Learning
  10. Research in Learning Technology

Do you have any others to add to the list?

How to fix our senseless compliance training

All big organisations have a Learning Management System.

It’s used to track and record the training that the employees do. In practice, it tends to be used to administer compliance training, though it can be much broader than that.

And this is a good thing. Despite the scorn that LMS’s attract, we should be tracking and recording the training that our employees do – especially compliance training.

Looking up at skyscrapers

But here’s the rub…

Let’s say I work at Bank A. I do all my compliance training within the first 3 months of starting at the company, and I keep those certifications up to date every 2 years. That’s normal.

Then I get a job at Bank B. But because my training records are locked up in Bank A’s LMS, I have to do my compliance training all over again.

This does not make any sense, because the laws governing privacy, anti money laundering, OH&S, and all the other topics, are the same for both banks! If I’m compliant at Bank A, odds are I’m compliant at Bank B as well.

I see re-doing my compliance training as a problem, not just because it’s an inconvenience for me personally, but also because the financial services sector alone employs half a million people in Australia. That’s a lot of people, a lot of movement, a lot of training hours, and a lot of wastage.

There has to be a better way, and as I explain in the video below, I propose the accreditation of compliance training with open badges as the solution.

Now some people misunderstand this idea, and they’ll say it’s not the role of the regulator to train a company’s employees. And I agree, but that’s not the idea.

The idea is that the regulator accredits the training that is delivered by the company to its employees, and authorises the issuing of the official badges for that training.

Taking out the trash

Happy new year!

I’m looking forward to 2015 as a time for exploring, building, experimenting, discovering, and learning.

Many of us like to make New Year’s resolutions in January – which rarely survive February – but this year mine are designed to last forever.

I hereby commit to the following five resolutions.

A green plastic trash bin.

1. No facey, no connecty.

Humans have heads and names. If you apparently don’t, I won’t connect.

2. Reject the hard sell.

If your first message to me is sales oriented, you’re dropped.

3. Do not feed the trolls.

If you lack an open and collaborative mindset, I won’t engage.

4. Do not feed the bullies.

Bully-boy tactics do not lend credence to your argument; in fact they do the opposite. If you try to force feed me, the conversation is over.

5. Shut the pop up.

If a pop-up interrupts my reading of your article, I won’t bother quitting the pop-up. I’ll just quit your article.

Apologies if this seems like a negative way to begin the new year. However, by taking out the trash, I intend to let the light shine in.

What are your New Year’s resolutions…?