Archive for the ‘mobile’ category

Out of the shadows

24 February 2014

“What apps do you recommend?”

With the proliferation of smartphones and tablets in the workplace, this is a question I am being asked with increasing frequency.

And I don’t really like answering it. I mean, I have my faves, but they are my faves. What I find useful might prove useless for you. It all depends on the nature of your role and what you are endeavouring to do with your device.

So to better inform my answer to this question, I am crowdsourcing a list of favorite business apps. I can now point to a dynamically curated selection of apps that a range of other people find useful. The weight of numbers lends credibility to my recommendations.

Businessman with information and resources streaming out of his smartphone

While it’s early days yet, I’m not surprised to see Evernote streaking ahead. In just about every conversation I have with my peers about apps, the peppermint pachyderm rates a mention. It seems everyone is talking about the elephant in the room!

However, I am surprised by the listing currently in second place: Dropbox. I’m not surprised by the fact it’s listed as a favourite app – Dropbox is excellent! – but rather that it’s listed as a favourite business app.

You see, while Dropbox offers wonderful affordances in terms of cloud-based storage and retrieval, it’s (apparently?) not very secure. Despite its Help Center’s claim to the contrary, the internet is littered with warnings such as this one and IT departments tend to frown upon its use.

Nonetheless, people use it. A lot. For business.

I see this as a sign of the times. Employees are circumventing their company’s restrictive and frustrating IT policies with their own technology.

Now I must stress that I am neither an IT manager nor a security expert. I am not arguing one way or the other on whether this is right or wrong. What I am saying is that this is happening. Shadow IT is casting itself over the corporate landscape.

Consider the implications for the e-learning professional:

  • Your employees expect to access information and resources on their own device – whatever make, model or operating system it may be.
  • Your employees are watching YouTube videos and engaging in social media, even if those sites are blocked by the company.
  • Your employees are participating in MOOCs, even if you disagree with their pedagogy.
  • Your employees are playing games when they get bored or they need a break.
  • Your employees are familiar with apps and they are using them.

The list goes on… You can try to suppress it – or embrace it.

Isn’t it time for your organisation’s e-learning to come out of the shadows?

Everything connects at Amplify

15 June 2011

AmplifyLast week I attended AMP’s biannual innovation and thought leadership festival, Amplify.

As usual, the speaker lineup was first class.

For those who couldn’t make it, I have linked to the recordings of most sessions below. For the sake of convenience I have organised them under three broad categories: Innovation, Social Media and Mobile. These categories are somewhat arbitrary and they blur to varying degrees.

As this year’s tagline states, everything connects!

Light bulb

Innovation

Sanjay Purohit, Vijaya Deepthi and Ananth Krishnan explain how innovation is managed at two massive Indian corporations, Infosys and Tata.

John Katzenbach lists 4 imperatives for promoting an innovative culture.

James Gardner proposes a strategic alternative to breakthrough innovation.

Venessa Miemis foresees the future of money.

Nigel Cameron questions the ethics of radical life extension.

Mike Hawley recognises the emergence of powerful but economically polarised super cities.

Alex Zelinsky predicts Australia’s National Broadband Network will drive innovation beyond the mining boom.

John O’Sullivan highlights the inventions that radio astronomy has brought into the world.

Network

Social media

Jeremiah Owyang walks through the 5 requirements of a corporation to prepare for social media, and the 5 goals that should define its strategy.

Andrew McAfee explains how social technology can help organisations overcome typical barriers to high performance.

Debbie Weil exposes the 5 truths of baby boomers and social media.

Peter Shergold argues that social media reinvigorates civic participation in government.

Richard Binhammer presents a case study on perhaps the most social corporation in the world, Dell.

Group of business people with smartphones

Mobile

Bob Egan reviews the relentless march of mobile connectivity.

Mark Zawacki predicts that everything will be in the cloud and your mobile device will be your thin client.

Barry Vercoe shows how the XO “$100 laptop” is improving digital literacy among children in the world’s remotest areas.

Amplify Festival

Watch even more speakers at the Amplify website, including John Hagel III, Jarod Green, Gunter Pauli, Xavier Rizos, John Smart, Iveta Brigis, Jim Benson, Rod Farmer, Ian Dunlop, Oliver Weidlich, Hugh Mackay, Michael Kordahi, Matt McDougall, Mike Nelson, Paul Cooper and Tony Golsby-Smith.